random thoughts to oil the mind

Tag: Languages Page 4 of 5

Trotzdem als Nebensatz

Dieser Eintrag ist auch auf Deutsch verfügbar.

Reading Kafka’s Der Prozeß recently, I came across an interesting construction that I hadn’t seen before.

Trotzdem K. gerade jetzt nicht daran gedacht hatte, sagte er sofort: “Gewiss, ich muss fortgehn. Ich bin Prokurist einer Bank, man wartet auf mich, ich bin nur hergekommen, um einem ausländischen Geschäftsfreund den Dom zu zeigen.”
Franz Kafka, Der Prozeß

I’d only ever heard trotzdem used in a main sentence, and never before to form a verb-shunting Nebensatz. I figured at first this might be a mistake on the part of the publishers – my copy was of rather low-budget quality – and that the word obwohl had been intended, but the form repeated itself a number of times throughout the book.

A quick bit of Google research later revealed that this form is perfectly common in the Randregionen of the German language, particularly in Bohemia and in Alpine areas, and used as a matter of course by authors such as Kafka, Stifter and Dürrenmatt. This older thread on wer-weiss-was.de has a great explanation, explaining that the form arose as a contraction of the now old-fashioned trotz dem, dass, and further points out that the form is pronounced with the stress on the second syllable.

Duden’s entry on the matter.

trotz|dem

Bedeutung

obwohl, obgleich

Beispiel

er kam, trotzdem (standardsprachlich: obwohl) er krank war

Herkunft

entstanden aus: trotz dem, dass …

Now to find out why the version of the text published here replaces these forms of trotzdem with the word obwohl. And why in my copy Kafka never capitalised the word gewiss even at the start of sentences.

Trotzdem als Nebensatz

This entry is also available in English.

Während ich neuerdings Kafkas Der Prozeß gelesen habe, bin ich über eine interessante und mir bis dato unbekannten Satzstruktur gestolpert.

Trotzdem K. gerade jetzt nicht daran gedacht hatte, sagte er sofort: “Gewiss, ich muss fortgehn. Ich bin Prokurist einer Bank, man wartet auf mich, ich bin nur hergekommen, um einem ausländischen Geschäftsfreund den Dom zu zeigen.”
Franz Kafka, Der Prozeß

Als Student der deutschen Sprache war mir das Wort trotzdem nur in Hauptsätzen bekannt, nie als Einleitung eines verbvertreibenden Nebensatzes. Ich hielt es anfänglich für einen Fehler seitens des Buchverlags, denn immerhin war meine Ausgabe eine ziemlich billige. Da hätte an der Stelle wohl obwohl stehen müssen. Doch die Konstruktion wiederholte sich mehrmals in Buch.

Nach einer Google-Befragung also stellte ich fest, dass diese Form tatsächlich in den Randregionen der deutschen Sprache sehr verbreitet sei. Vor allem in den Alpen und Böhmen sei diese Form gängig, daher versteht es sich von selbst, dass Schriftsteller wie Kafka, Stifter und Dürrenmatt von ihr Gebrauch machen. Ein etwas älterer Faden auf wer-weiss-was.de bietet eine tolle Erklärung, dass dieses Wort als eine zusammengezogene Form des nun altmodischen „trotz dem, dass“ zu verstehen ist und hebt hervor, dass die Betonung in diesem Falle auf der zweiten Silbe liegt.

Der diesbezügliche Eintrag im Duden:

trotz|dem

Bedeutung

obwohl, obgleich

Beispiel

er kam, trotzdem (standardsprachlich: obwohl) er krank war

Herkunft

entstanden aus: trotz dem, dass …

Nun muss ich nur noch herausfinden, warum die Ausgabe des Textes hier dieses trotzdem durch obwohl ersetzt. Und warum in meiner Ausgabe Kafka das Wort gewiss nie groß schreibt, selbst wenn es am Anfang eines Satzes steht.

The Infected German Language

This post is nothing more than the idle musings of a person entirely unqualified to judge upon the vagaries of the German language. Certainly being no linguist, nor even having control over anything stronger than a tiny smattering of Denglish, I can only claim to comment as an outsider looking in, and any resemblance to reality is purely coincidental. 1And yes, the title is a play on that rather more succinct and eloquent survey, The Awful German Language by Mark Twain. Regardless, here a couple of thoughts that my contact with German has provoked.

   [ + ]

1. And yes, the title is a play on that rather more succinct and eloquent survey, The Awful German Language by Mark Twain.

Beware the Squiggly Red Line

Our language is constantly evolving. That’s almost a tautology for any language that hasn’t been officially pronounced dead. Whilst the rate of change often appears virtually imperceptible to us, a quick flick through a dictionary containing word etymologies, or a glance at the literature from bygone centuries soon proves the point. Words arise and mutate, they spontaneously alter their usage and change their position in a sentence, they crop up in unusual scenarios through metaphor, and before long appear to us in an entirely new guise from their original form. Whilst we occasionally borrow words from foreign languages, and typically for the moment derive new words for new technologies, the main source of new words in our language comes from the current stock. Each of us has an inbuilt sense of how words should be used and formed, and through repetition and popularity, a new word (or an old one with new stripes) can worm its way into one of those revered tomes we like to call dictionaries.

WordPress 2.8 Roadmap

With the latest 2.7 release barely out of the door, the WordPress team are already looking to set out the roadmap for 2.8. The recent update had an impressive mix of tweaks, fixes, features and a nice interface overhaul, and their little survey has a list of tasks to prioritise for the next release. Unfortunately, however, the one thing I should really like to see doesn’t make an appearance, that being some simpler ways to create a multilingual blog built into the core. At the moment there are a number of plugins out there that offer to do just that, and whilst they may do exactly as they say on the tin, the potential for a plugin to become outdated and fall behind the current WordPress release could create a lot of work sometime in the future, not to mention the fact that each plugin goes about creating a multilingual environment in its own unique way. Whilst I’m not alone in calling for at least some standardised framework, I can’t see any progress being made in the near future.

Page 4 of 5

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén