random thoughts to oil the mind

Tag: Translation Page 1 of 2

Daily Links

Reflections – A fabulous series of photographs from Tom Hussey showing elderly people looking at the reflections of their past selves.

Anthea Bell Obituary – One of the most prolific and successful translators into English from French, German and Danish, and brainmother of the brilliant Dogmatix and Getafix generation of loveable Asterix characters.

Paul Ryan’s Long Con – An interesting article from Vox on this failed poster boy for an almost sane GOP.

TED: Economies of Growth – Economist Kate Raworth on the importance of breaking out of the growth trap. I’m sceptical that mankind will voluntarily find a happy equilibrium, but Malthus will get us in the end.

[Photo by Patrick Fore on Unsplash]

Ein kleiner Kniff für die Qualitätssicherung bei memoQ

This post is also available in English.

Die Übersetzungssoftware memoQ verfügt über eine nützliche Funktion als teil des QA-Checks, wodurch in der Zielsprache nach verdoppelten Wörtern geprüft wird. In meinem Fall hat es schon mehrmals auf kleine Tippfehler hingewiesen, wo ich versehentlich ein „and and“ oder ein „to to“ geschrieben habe. Dennoch bleibt der Vorteil dieses Checks etwas eingeschränkt, wenn man in seiner Sprache regelmäßig solche Formen hat, die diese Verdoppelung verlangen. Im Deutschen denkt man an Sätze, die die Wörter „die die“ verlangen. Der französische Übersetzer wiederum rauft sich die Haare, als ihm memoQ zum zigsten Mal ein „nous nous“ ankreidet.

Doch mithilfe der relativ neu eingebauten Regex-Funktion kann man dieses Problem tatsächlich beheben. Editiert man seinen Regelsatz für die Qualitätssicherung, kann man den Standardcheck unter dem Konsistenz-Reiter ausschalten, dafür unter dem Regex-Reiter eine neue Regel erstellen, die diesen Check ersetzt aber Rücksicht auf Ausnahmen nimmt. Für Französisch zum Beispiel kann man die folgende Regel als Forbidden regex match in target1Leider sind die Hilfsseiten von Kilgray auf Deutsch nicht aktuell, daher hier die englischen Namen. eingeben:

(?i)(?![nv]ous\b)(\b\S+\b)\s+\b\1\b

Wenn aktiviert, prüft diese Regel weiterhin nach doppelten Wörtern in der Zielsprache, einschließlich üblicher Interpunktionszeichen wie bspw. Apostrophen, ignoriert jedoch jeder Fall von „nous nous“ oder „vous vous“. Die Ausnahmen in der Regel vorne kann man dann beliebig erweitern, je nach Bedarf. Die Regel ist bestimmt nicht fehlerlos, aber sie kann die Anzahl der falschen Warnungen enorm verringern, ohne dass man auf diesen Check komplett verzichten muss.

[Foto von Ilya Pavlov auf Unsplash]

   [ + ]

1. Leider sind die Hilfsseiten von Kilgray auf Deutsch nicht aktuell, daher hier die englischen Namen.

memoQ QA Check Tweak

Dieser Eintrag ist auch auf Deutsch verfügbar.

memoQ has a handy little feature as part of its QA check which warns you whenever you double up a word in the target language. I’ve had it catch numerous little and ands and to tos which slip into my work on occasion. However certain combinations of doubled up words are fairly commonplace, which can lead to this feature producing lots of unnecessary false errors. A classic example in English might be two hads in a sentence like ‘I had had enough,’ but that pales in comparison to a language like French, which sees plenty of doubled up words in pronominal verbs (nous nous lavons, vous vous souvenez etc.)

One way to fix this is to make use of the relatively new regex feature built into the QA check. Untick the option to check for duplicate words in the target under the Consistency tab. Then under the Regex tab we can replicate this functionality, while including our own exception to the rule. Add a new rule of the type Forbidden regex match in target, give it a relevant description, and then add this target regex:

(?i)(?![nv]ous\b)(\b\S+\b)\s+\b\1\b

When active, this rule will continue to highlight any duplicate words in the translation, including all the usual punctuation marks, but ignores any occurrences of nous nous or vous vous. Obviously these exceptions at the front can be replaced with whatever is required in the target language. The rule isn’t by any means flawless, and will for example also complain about repeated sequences of numbers, but it can help to reduce the number of false positives without having to abandon the check altogether.

[Photo by Ilya Pavlov on Unsplash]

Photo by Pedro Gandra (https://unsplash.com/pedrogandra)

Daily Links

Das geteilte Land – Looking at Germany after 25 years of union. Statistics show how much remains of the former East.

Spearfishing Orang-utan – A beautiful image of an Orang-utan on Borneo using a stick to try to hunt passing fish, presumably learned from watching nearby villagers.

Linguistic Ignorantisms – Nice list of words grammar nazis would find difficult to use with a straight face.

Further and Farther: A Theory – Go far and wide, go farrer and wider! Go forth and multiply, go further and multiplier!

Alice in a World of Wonderlands – A look at one of the most widely translated (untranslatable) works of literature in the world.

Some Rules of Language are Wired in the Brain – A Scientific American article shows how looking at synaesthesia might give some clues into our understanding of words.

Daily Links

20 Signs You’re Doing Better Than You Think You Are – An asinine list, as described by one commenter, but a welcome reminder of how good most of us have it.

Translating Seinfeld – Or why Rowan Atkinson will always be Mr Bean rather than Mr Blackadder abroad.

The Internet in Real-Time – Watch the internet grow (and the giants skim off the cream).

Hemingway Editor – Write like Hemingway. Or gradually be nudged into being written like Hemingway?

The Colors We Eat – Tasting colours is for more than just synaesthetes.

The Mysterious Origins of Punctuation – An often overlooked side-effect of Gutenberg’s moveable type: stagnation in writing systems.

Page 1 of 2

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén